Lectures

 

On 10th September 2015, at Serbian Literary Society, Biljana Andonovska deliverd a lecture on Aleksandar Vučo's novel Mrtve javke (1957) and the representation of war in Vučo's prose.

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In collaboration with our Project, Seminar for social history at Petnica Science Center has organized a two-day research block about Rastko Petrović and avant-garde art, conducted by doc. Predrag Petrović. Workshop included lectures, reading classes, presentation of rare documentary materials (films directed by R. Petrović and S. Krakov), as well as discussions about avant-garde poetics and representation of the WWI in Petrović's art.

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On 12th March 2013, Vesna Matović delivered a lecture on The Journalistic and Literary work of Pera Todorović at the Faculty of Political Sciences in Belgrade for students of Master’s Degree and doctoral studies.

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On 27th November 2012, Vesna Matović delivered a lecture entitled The Similarities and Differences between German and Serbian Periodicals of the Era of Modernism and the Avant-garde at the Institute of Slavic Studies in Hamburg for students of South Slavic studies.

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Within the framework of the attendant programmes of the exhibition Re /vision: Periodicals as Agents of Literature and Culture, on Thursday, 29th November 2012, at the amphitheatre of the National Library of Serbia, Milan Miljković delivered a lecture entitled Leafing through ‒ How to Teach Periodicals at the University and in Secondary School?

If education, among other things, presupposes enabling pupils and students to deal with the socio-political, economic and cultural conditions that await them in ten years’ time, or more, for that matter, is there any point at all to introducing (literary) periodicals in the curriculum at a moment when the printed media are generally perceived as undergoing a crisis while electronic devices and services for reading/browsing digital books, magazines, web pages, blogs, forums and social networks are expanding at an unprecedented rate?

Can a complex methodology for studying periodicals, together with the exciting materials provided by literary periodicals, daily papers and illustrated magazines, transform the methodology of studying and teaching literary history and other humanist disciplines? Can studying/teaching periodicals highlight more clearly the importance of practising the skills of critical, academic and scientific thought, as opposed to passive acquisition and possession of knowledge and information? Does it offer a possibility for establishing a connection between the studying/teaching of inevitably historical literary matters with the acute issues raised by the media, their transformations, the contextual, modelling and critical function of the public?

Bearing in mind the resources of our educational system, examples of foreign practices, the scientific-research results of the Institute for Literature and Art, as well as the digitalised holdings of the National Library of Serbia, through this lecture we shall strive to project an outline of how teaching literature through (literary) periodicals may contribute to modelling critically oriented pupils and students, who could ponder all the challenges of new and old identities: civic, national, ethnic, cultural, class, gender and religious ones, more openly and with greater courage than we can.

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Within the framework of the attendant programmes of the exhibition Re /vision: Periodicals as Agents of Literature and Culture, on Thursday, 22nd November 2012, at the amphitheatre of the National Library of Serbia Slobodanka Peković and Stanislava Barać delivered a lecture entitled From Feminine to Feminist – Women’s Periodicals from Domaćica [Housewife] to Žena danas [Woman Today].

During the course of the two centuries of publishing women’s periodicals in the Serbian language – whether we count its history from the publication of the first calendar intended for “ladies and young girls” (1807), or from the first periodical edited by a woman (the almanac Talija, 1829) – the period from the 1890’s to the beginning of World War Two turns out to be of exceptional importance when it comes to the declining dominance of the patriarchal discourse and the strengthening of feminist discourses in the corpus of women’s periodicals as a whole.

“The golden era” of women’s periodicals was marked by a lesser degree of focusing on education, which presupposed giving advice on how to run the household, bring children up and manage relations within the family. Texts dedicated to prominent women, women’s rights and news concerning feminist movements cautiously opened up a new discourse, presaging a democratisation of society, wherein women became visible as well.

The concept of the majority of women’s periodicals published before the First World War was similar: they supported women’s self-awareness, whether by encouraging women to publish (Žena) or to join forces (Domaćica), but also insisted on traditional “women’s” values – faithfulness to the family, father, husband, children and the nation, so that one could speak of women’s periodicals from the beginning of the 20th century as a transitional form pointing from the construct of an entirely patriarchal to a truly emancipated woman. It was only with the establishment of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes that consistently emancipatory feminist periodicals appeared, be it in the form of theoretically oriented ones (Ženski pokret [Women’s Movement], Jugoslovenska žena [Yugoslav Woman]), education-entertainment oriented ones (Žena danas), or in the form of illustrated fashion magazines with a pronounced feminist tendency (Žena i svet [Woman and the World], Ženski svet [Women’s World]).

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Within the framework of the attendant programmes of the exhibition Re /vision: Periodicals as Agents of Literature and Culture, on Thursday, 8th November 2012, at the amphitheatre of the National Library of Serbia Dragana Grbić delivered a lecture entitled Comets and Balloons in the 18th-century Sky.

On the basis of the content of newspaper texts published in the first Serbian paper – Сербскїя новины повседневныя [Serbian Daily News], news items about unusual phenomena and events, the aim of the lecture was to point to one of the key issues of the religious-philosophical debates of the era and to examine the attitude towards miracles in the context of the philosophy of enlightenment towards the end of the 18th century.

On the basis of the said newspaper articles, apart from the issues through which the programmatic foundation of the era is problematised, it is at the same time possible to analyse the cultural-historical framework within which the Enlightenment principles were realised. Hence, what is reviewed are, on the one hand, unusual and exemplary/strange phenomena or inventions created by individuals, while, on the other hand, those phenomena are placed within the context of collective social occurrences. The central example is an analysis of newspaper articles dealing with a scientific miracle of the time – the hot air balloon, the flight of which was virtually an obligatory feature of almost every court spectacle and an unavoidable segment of almost any celebration of importance.

Aiming to point to various stylistic and programmatic tendencies of the 18th century, in addition to the newspaper texts dealing with hot air balloons, newspaper and scientific texts about the appearances of comets were also examined.

Within the framework of marking half a century of the work of the Institute for Literature and Art, on 3rd July 2012 two lectures were held at the National Library of Serbia by Milan Miljković (“The Time When Poetry Spoke”) and Stanislava Barać (“ ‘In a Year of Culture the Sun Shines More Beautifully…’ ”), dealing with issues pertaining to the media, the cultural policy and the interpenetration of aesthetic and socio-political discourses in the Serbian press and literary periodicals of the last decade of the 20th century.

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On 3th June 2012, Biljana Andonovska and Simona Čupić provided an expert guidance through the multimedia exhibition Krleza: The Dream of the Other Side, organized within The Festival of One Writer at the Cultural Centre of Belgrade.

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The Time When Poetry Spoke ‒ the Discourse of Nationalism in the Poems Published by Politika’s Cultural Supplement in the Early 1990’s

Does lyrical poetry still retain the right to the aesthetic autonomy of its production and reception? And when? What happens if a poem is published on the pages of daily papers or their weekly supplements, such as Politika’s Saturday supplement entitled Culture – Art – Science? In such a case, is a poem read as a poetic text in itself, or does the newspaper framework dictate a different, political reading of it? What is the symbolic weight of the author’s name, printed on the margin of the poem?

Does lyrical poetry still retain the right to the aesthetic autonomy of its production and reception? And when? What happens if a poem is published on the pages of daily papers or their weekly supplements, such as Politika’s Saturday supplement entitled Culture – Art – Science? In such a case, is a poem read as a poetic text in itself, or does the newspaper framework dictate a different, political reading of it? What is the symbolic weight of the author’s name, printed on the margin of the poem?

Culture in a Regime of Repressive Tolerance: ‘In a Year of Culture, the Sun Shines More Beautifully…’

The events on the cultural, that is, the media scene in Serbia in 1994, the year which preceded the officially designated “year of culture”, reveal the mechanisms of repressive tolerance that this regime practised, be it according to a plan or at random, as one of its strategies towards establishing ideological hegemony. The caving in of the Književna reč [Literary Word] periodical, changes of the editorial staff, duplication of literary periodicals published under the same name, the establishment of the Reč [Word] periodical, the position of comics and subversive discourses in them, together with the editorial policy of the state television, are revealed both as the symptoms and the consequences of the state policy that managed to avoid being a dictatorship and functioned effectively as authoritarian repression. One of the questions in this context is how censorship functions in such surroundings.